Mariarosaria Stigliano

“I started painting what I saw, what I was breathing every day. The city, with its streets, the lights that switch on as night falls, the hustle of life that rapidly goes by in the footsteps of people that pass you by for a second and then disappear behind the corner.“

After a degree in Law, you have chosen to go for a second one, in painting, at the “Accademia di Belle Arti”. What brought you to art? Is there one thing, also a small one, that you have been able to exploit of your former studies?

The Law degree was for the family, the one in painting instead to be able to express who I truly am. These two paths are really different one another, but maybe I could say the first one has given me the passion for research I then applied in a completely different field: painting.

What are the themes you love to represent the most?

I love to go with the flow and I don’t feel tied to a single theme, but more to a suggestion that changes continually.

Many of your painting have as setting urban areas. How do you perceive these places? How do you explain your interest for such locations?

I started painting what I saw, what I was breathing everyday. The city, with its streets, the lights that switch on as night falls, the hustle of life that rapidly goes by in the footsteps of people that pass you by for a second and then disappear behind the corner.

It is in these contexts that I look for the atmosphere of a stolen moment; a shot that is able to suggest the viewer something of his own, something he can recognize himself in.

The human figures in your paintings are mostly shadows that move in a chaotic scene. What does this say about your idea of the relationship between individuals, the city and the sense of transience?

My figures are some “present-absent” entities that run fast, have no time to stop and be looked at or to look at you. They have no identity in order to suggest without saying and be without having to represent anything.

"Notturno"
"Giostra"
"Gazometro"
"Stazione"

You have come up with a special technique. How did you develop it? How much important do you think it is to have a personal technique?

My technique is connected with the way I treat the canvas -where I usually remove and drag around the colors. The process that brought me to this style, using materials as pigments, varnishes and oils, has been a cumulative one and based on the research that every painter does day by day. Having a personal technique means having an own voice and a way of looking at things and expressing yourself that makes you recognizable and in which you recognize yourself.

An artist that has particularly influenced you? How?

I always have a passion for Renzo Vespignani and everytime I see his works and the strength of his expressivity I desire to start drawing and painting.

A soundtrack that goes along with your paintings?

Rock music, the same I listen while painting…

A contemporary painter you want to point us out?

I really like Aron Wiesenfeld, he excites me with each of his images.

Next and upcoming projects?

I have a planned symposium abroad and a number of exhibitions around Italy…but mostly I have in mind to create many new artworks.

east-side-olio-pigmenti-e-smalti-su-tela-2016
"Eastside"

Credits: Mariarosaria Stigliano

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